How to Stop Robocalls

Robocalls - we all seem to get them these days. And locally, with our large student population from China and Taiwan, Ithaca has its own special kind of madness; robocalls in Chinese! The technology and cost to create and make these kinds of calls is simple and incredibly cheap - hence all the calls at all hours. Here, Hewlett Packard provides some of the basics in attempting to reduce this annoying part of everyones day.
 
How often do you find yourself at your desk in the middle of a critical, time-sensitive project only to have your concentration shattered by the ear-piercing ring of your mobile phone?
 
You look down and see your friend, “Scam Likely,” calling once again. He must be a good friend because you hear from him at work at least twice a day, and he seems relaxed enough to call at the most inopportune times. You want to end your connection with him – given his rude interruptions – but you’re not quite sure how to do it.
 
The first thing you need to know is that you’re most likely dealing with isn’t a person at all but a robocall. What is that? Well, if you answer your mobile phone and hear what sounds like it might be a previously recorded message, it is most likely a robocall.
 
And it could very well be an unlawful attempt to reach you.

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When Simple Data Backup is NOT Enough

 

You know you need data backup, but when do you need a business continuity solution?

If you’ve been paying attention to the news, you’ll know that massive global ransomware attacks are only growing in scale and frequency. These attacks and other threats and accidents that cripple, ransom, or destroy organizations’ data are a convincing argument for a solid backup solution. Restoring from a data backup is often the only reliable way to recover from these events. Even smaller organizations and businesses know that they need some sort of backup solution now. But when do you need more than a regular data backup?

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What's a VPN? And Why You Should be Using One

These days, VPN and public WiFi are almost always used in the same sentence. Here's some basics on virtual private networks and why it's a really good idea to have one!!

If you’ve ever wondered if it’s safe to use public Wi-Fi, you are not alone. In fact, according to the Norton Cybersecurity Insights Report, 6 in 10 consumers believe using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom. And it is. Surfing the Web or transacting on an unsecured Wi-Fi network means you’re placing your private information and anonymity at risk. That’s why a virtual private network, better known as a VPN, is a must for anyone worried about online security and privacy.

What is a VPN?

A virtual private network gives you online privacy and anonymity by creating a private network from a public Internet connection. VPNs mask your Internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. Most important, VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections, guaranteed to provide greater privacy than even a secured Wi-Fi hotspot.

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On the Road Again!

As I like to say: "Give me a cellphone, laptop or tablet, and a good internet connection and I can be connected from anywhere!" We Ithacans travel alot...probably more than average. Here are some suggestions on what to carry when you're away from home.

Pack these essential technology tools

As business travelers, many of us assume all we need is a lightweight laptop and a decent Wi-Fi connection. But how often do we find ourselves struggling with tangled cords, dead batteries or the inability to print important documents in a critical moment? Probably more often than we care to admit.

American workers take more than 405 million business trips annually, equating to about 1.1 million individuals in the U.S. traveling for work every day. Having the right accessories on hand can make the difference between a successful or disastrous outing.
Here are five technology tools every small business should consider for keeping their on-the-go employees well prepared and productive:

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Where is Your Online Search Going?

Dishonest companies set up websites that look like legitimate places to get information on finding a job, joining the military, or getting government benefits. But they might not help you with any of those things. Instead, they’ll take your personal information and sell it to other companies. The companies that buy those “leads” then try to pitch you products or services you didn’t ask for.

The FTC has reached a settlement with Career Education Corporation (CEC). According to the FTC, CEC bought leads from companies that set up sites to attract people looking for things like jobs, how to join the military, and Medicaid information. All to collect people’s information. The people who responded to those sites then got calls trying to get them to enroll in CEC’s post-secondary schools.

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