The Key to iPhone Data Recovery

Hundreds of broken, damaged and malfunctioning iPhones are sent to DriveSavers every month for data recovery. Despite having the best smartphone success rate in the industry, we aren’t able to recover all of them. Many factors are involved, some of which we’ll go into here.

To obtain the best results in recovering an iPhone, DriveSavers engineers must carefully coax it into a semi-functional state, at least briefly, in order to extract the important data.

Every single phone that comes in the door may require hours of inspection and testing to locate the point or points of failure. In many cases, hardware engineers will have to micro solder multiple jumpers and leads in addition to cleaning corrosion and other forms of damage to get a device to power up.

When we do get an iPhone to work again, we don’t know how long it will remain viable, so we have to move quickly at that point to rescue the important data.

Most of the iPhones we receive are protected by passcodes, which we highly recommend as just one measure to protect sensitive personal information. You can learn other security measures from our article, 7 Ways to Secure Your Smartphone.

Passcode protection may still be active, even if the phone is unusable. iPhone encryption and security is very robust—increasingly so with each new version. If our engineers don’t have a working passcode, iPhone data recovery may not be possible.

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Apple IOS and OS X Security Issue & Fix

As many of us know, Apple Computer does a pretty good job of controlling the security features of their two main operating systems, Apple IOS for iPhones and iPads, and Apple OS X for most Mac computers..  They do such a good job that most people don't have any special security software installed on their machines and devices.  But, they are NOT perfect.  

Recently, what's turned out to be a major security hole has occurred in both Apple operating systems.  I'll let others discuss the details of the security flaw, what the potential issues are, and whether the NSA had anything to do with it.  (You gotta love all the speculation in the media!)  Here is what to do:

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Which "Pad" to buy?

What a difference 30 months make!  In May 2010, I wrote about my initial experiences with the first Apple iPad. I was really excited about what it could do and how content could be read or consumed nearly anywhere.  There had been a few “pads” built prior, but nothing like the iPad.  All the big pieces came together with a very readable color screen, highly accurate touch technology, a fast processor, plenty of storage, and thousands of available “apps”.  Access to information happened  over WiFi or a cellular connection.  Most everyone raved about the iPad and it validated what has become known as BYOD (bring your own device) to the corporate world. 

So, here we are 30 months later.  There are now over two dozen different choices in tablets from virtually every major computer and consumer hardware manufacturer.  Even Google and Microsoft have entered the fray.  Apple has two different iPads out there and the iPad mini.  Google, Samsung, Kindle, Nook, and many others have competing models.  Not surprisingly, the choice of what to buy isn’t so obvious any more.

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Apple announces iPhone 5

Editors note - It's been all over the news and Apple has already pre-sold millions of units.  Here is Apple's news release on the major features of the new iPhone 5.

 

Thinnest, Lightest iPhone Ever Features All-New Aluminum Design, Stunning 4-Inch Retina Display, A6 Chip & Ultrafast Wireless
 

SAN FRANCISCO—September 12, 2012—Apple® today announced iPhone® 5, the thinnest and lightest iPhone ever, completely redesigned to feature a stunning new 4-inch Retina™ display; an Apple-designed A6 chip for blazing fast performance; and ultrafast wireless technology*—all while delivering even better battery life.** iPhone 5 comes with iOS 6, the world’s most advanced mobile operating system with over 200 new features including: the all new Maps app with Apple-designed cartography and turn-by-turn navigation; Facebook integration; Passbook® organization; and even more Siri® features and languages.

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Apple Macintosh viruses reported

April 1st – the day when all sorts of jokes, stories, and elaborate hoaxes are played on the public by venerated news organizations, manufacturers, the government, and of course from the Internet.  Our friends at Google launched a fantastic new product based on Morse Code.  NOT!!

However, this past April, an issue that has been around for a while created quite a media stir and wasn't a joke.  Apple Macintosh computers getting viruses or more precisely a thing called a “Flashback Trojan Horse”.   Thousands of words were written about over 600,000 Mac computers being attacked by malicious malware code.  We had quite a few clients call us and bring-in their Macs – just to check.

So, is this real, a big deal, or not?  Some facts and suggestions:

The first thing to understand is yes, this particular issue is real.  However, the infection of 600,000 computers is actually quite small.  There are literally millions of Apple OS X licenses out there.  Not as many as PCs, but as these things go, this infection is pretty minor.  Our shop checked a number of client Macintoshes and we checked all of The Computing Center’s own machines.  Not one of them had the Flashback Trojan.

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