The phenomena of #hashtag

It’s a simple symbol – two lines intersecting two lines. It’s been known as the number sign, the pound sign and the hash mark. It’s used for different purposes in linguistics, mathematics and computing. Of course, we’re talking about the # symbol. It’s a simple sign, but one with growing influence.

Today, the # symbol is used to create “hashtags” in social media posts on sites like Twitter and Facebook. A hashtag is the # symbol followed by a word or phrase.

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Behind every great device is a great network

 

Exponential growth in the use of smart devices has led to significant and increased demand for bandwidth across 84 per cent of organizations surveyed globally, according to new research commissioned by BT and Cisco. More than half (56 per cent) of IT managers have also noticed a resulting performance decline in some applications, which impacts negatively the productivity gains promised by smart devices. Almost half (46 per cent) of workers with Wi-Fi access in their office have experienced delays logging on or accessing an application, while 39 per cent have noticed they are running more slowly now than before.

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Creating the Perfect BYOD Recipe

The perfect BYOD recipe: "Finding the balance between protecting corporate data and providing privacy"!

I was just listening to Jon Stewart interview NY Times writer Michael Moss about his new book Salt Sugar Fat and he said something that struck a chord with me. He was talking about the science of creating food and something called the "Bliss factor." That perfect balance that will ensure that the products are a smash hit with consumers. That's where I want to go with BYOD (Bring your own device) policy. I've been searching for that perfect mix of hardware, software and education that will protect my IP—yet give my consumers that rush they get when eating a Twinkie. OK, I know it's a bit of flight-o-fancy to think that a BYOD policy can compare to a Twinkie (they are coming back!), but why not, why not venture out on that quest, at least for a little bit.  

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Tips to Improve Wireless Coverage

(Editor's Note:  Nearly everyone uses wireless (Wi-Fi) networks these days.  This article is targeted toward home users, how best to place and use wireless access points and wireless routers, but there's a lot of good information here for small business wireless systems as well.)

If your operating system ever notifies you about a weak Wi-Fi signal, it probably means that your connection isn't as fast or as reliable as it could be. Worse, you might lose your connection entirely in some parts of your home. If you want to boost the signal for your wireless network (WLAN), try some of these tips for extending your wireless range and improving your wireless network speed and performance.

1. Position your wireless router, modem router, or access point in a central location

When possible, place your wireless router, wireless modem router (a DSL or cable modem with a built-in wireless router), or wireless access point (WAP) in a central location in your home. If your wireless router, modem router, or access point is against an outside wall of your home, the signal will be weak on the other side of your home. If your router is on the first floor and your PC or laptop is on the second floor, place the router high on a shelf in the room where it is located. Don't worry if you can't move your wireless router, because there are many other ways to improve your connection.

2. Move the router off the floor and away from walls and metal objects (such as metal file cabinets)

Metal objects, walls, and floors will interfere with your router's wireless signals. The closer your router is to these obstructions, the more severe the interference, and the weaker your connection will be.

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The Future of IT

What an exciting time to be in the tech industry. We are at the beginning of a major transition to the Mobile-Cloud era. Trends like bring your own device (BYOD), access anywhere, virtualization, and machine-to-machine connections have given way to a new breed of applications. We estimate that approximately 50 billion devices will be connected by 2020. In 2010 alone, more than 350, 000 applications were developed with more than three million downloads. A 44-fold increase in data creation is predicted from 2010 to 2020, with 34 percent of it in the cloud. All of this leads to a world of intuitive connections between people, processes, data and things on the network – the Internet of Everything.

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