Keeping your Information Private

There's a robust discussion relative to whether any personal data is really private anymore. There are those who are totally paranoid about data privacy and those who don't care at all - assuming that everything about them is public (somewhere). Like most of us, if you're in the middle, here's some good suggestions relative to keeping your personal information nominally private.

The Internet has blurred the lines between real world and the virtual one. Technology is barreling into our hands through smartphones at an unbelievable pace. This is good for productivity and progress, but it makes it easy for thieves to do their job.

The anonymity and location independence that comes with the Internet muddles the moral character of even the most ethical person. There’s no assuming your phone and the information it stores is safe from the malicious intentions of the human mind.

Remember, the first line of defense in protecting your data is you. Learn about new threats, stay current and take the necessary precautions to keep your data safe. Here are tips that will give you some insight into keeping your devices safe:

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Deploying Two-Factor Authentication!

 how to deploy two factor authentication

 

Put those passwords in their place!

Cybercrime is constantly on the rise. It seems like every quarter there is a new breach of a major website, with hackers stealing the online credentials of hundreds of thousands to millions of unwitting users, including small businesses. A Poneman Institute study showed that the average cost of a data breach increased from $7.91 million in 2018 to $8.19 million in 2019 which is the highest cost globally.
 
Passwords offer one level of protection. But for a deeper level of protection, you also need two-factor authentication.

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Is Private Browsing Really Private?

A lot of people get confused with private browsing thinking it's something that it is not. This is a good explanation of what it is and how to get want you likely "really want"!

You probably expect your “private” browser to be private. It’s not. So-called private browsers are a standard feature of several web browsers, and have private-sounding names like Private Browsing, Private Tab, and Private Window. Using a private browsing mode can help you to do a lot of things, but maintaining total privacy isn’t one of them.

That doesn’t mean they’re not useful.

It’s important to understand what a private browser does, and does not, do. For instance, do you know that browsing history can still be accessed in most browsers when you browse in private mode? Chances are, you want privacy and safety when you go online. So how do you get it?

Hint: Think VPN or virtual private network.

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What's a VPN? And Why You Should be Using One

These days, VPN and public WiFi are almost always used in the same sentence. Here's some basics on virtual private networks and why it's a really good idea to have one!!

If you’ve ever wondered if it’s safe to use public Wi-Fi, you are not alone. In fact, according to the Norton Cybersecurity Insights Report, 6 in 10 consumers believe using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom. And it is. Surfing the Web or transacting on an unsecured Wi-Fi network means you’re placing your private information and anonymity at risk. That’s why a virtual private network, better known as a VPN, is a must for anyone worried about online security and privacy.

What is a VPN?

A virtual private network gives you online privacy and anonymity by creating a private network from a public Internet connection. VPNs mask your Internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. Most important, VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections, guaranteed to provide greater privacy than even a secured Wi-Fi hotspot.

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How to protect your "Digital Footprint"

The term "digital footprint" goes back to at least 2014. However, it's now become a popular term and it's something that everyone that uses the Internet for anything has. 

Your “digital footprint” includes all traces of your online activity, including your comments on news articles, posts on social media, and records of your online purchases.

When you know the boundaries of your digital footprint and take steps to contain it, you can help protect your identity and your reputation.

What is a digital footprint?

Every time you post something online, share content, or even when a website collects your information by installing cookies on your device, you are creating a digital trail. This includes your IP address, your login details, and other personal information that you reveal online. Information that is posted about you also gets added to your data trail.

What your digital footprint can say about you?

It’s a good idea to have a positive digital footprint. This information is your digital identity, and it could show up when someone searches for your name online.

Your online identity can influence different aspects of your life. For example, employers, schools, colleges, and law enforcement officials could use your digital footprint as a basis for character assessment.

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