Avoiding Public Wi-Fi Woes

Some of us travel a lot for business and even more of us travel occassionally for pleasure. Connecting to Wi-Fi is a regular activity while traveling. Unfortunately, not all Wi-Fi connections are secure and some of them are completely crooked. This article from our friends at Norton discusses public Wi-Fi access and how to keep your information safe.

Now that summer is here, it's not just families that will be filling airports and hotels. While other people may be vacationing, business travelers will continue to work their way around the country and the world. According to the quarterly GBTA Sentiment Business Traveler Index, these working travelers face challenges in staying productive on the go — and mobile connectivity is a large factor in the success of a business trip. Although often overlooked, staying secure on public Wi-Fi should also be an important part of business travel.

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Keeping eCommerce Info Safe

Like it or not, virtually all businesses are using eCommerce in some way. We continually help clients with SSL certificates, deciding what data should be saved and where it should be stored. However, not every client contact need be virtual. There's nothing like a phone call or a meeting to help cement a long-term relationship.  

Ecommerce has become commonplace as businesses and online tools have made it easier and easier to exchange goods and services with customers around the globe.

While some consumers may have advanced knowledge of online security practices and feel confident shopping on various ecommerce sites, other consumers may not feel as comfortable. It's up to you as a business owner not only to convince potential customers to shop with you, but also to protect their information online. Follow best practices to protect your customers' sensitive online data.

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What the heck are Grayware, Adware, and Madware?

We had heard of "grayware", but "adware" and "madware" were foreign. Like a moderized "Madmen"? Nope -- read on to learn about a few new terms in the ongoing security battle.

If you're like most Internet users, you've never even heard of grayware, adware or madware. That's because these are all lower on the threat scale in the world of malicious programming. What's more, they toe the line between legitimate programs and actively harmful applications.

Here's your quick guide to the new wave of code you don't want on your computer:

What Is Grayware?

Grayware is a more succinct name for "potentially unwanted programs". It's not a virus and it's not as obviously malicious as a lot of other problematic code floating around on the Internet. Make no mistake about it, though, that grayware needs to come off of whatever machine it's on. Not only is it probably already really bothering you every time you use your machine, it's also probably causing your machine long-lasting problems.

At their most innocuous, grayware infections are just annoying. For example, some grayware just barrage you with pop-up ads that make your Internet experience markedly slower and more labor intensive. However, in some situations, grayware might also be tracking what you do as you browse the Web. In any situation, grayware is opening you up to more noxious security issues just by being there. It's the tip of the spear that other forms of malware can exploit to get their way into your computer.

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Are Regular Password Changes a Good Policy?

Data security is a process that evolves over time as new threats emerge and new countermeasures are developed. The FTC's longstanding advice to companies has been to conduct risk assessments, taking into account factors such as the sensitivity of information they collect and the availability of low-cost measures to mitigate risks. The FTC has also advised companies to keep abreast of security research and advice affecting their sector, as that advice may change. What was reasonable in 2006 may not be reasonable in 2016. This blog post provides a case study of why keeping up with security advice is important. It explores some age-old security advice that research suggests may not be providing as much protection as people previously thought.

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Biometrics - How do they work and are they safe?

We are starting to see some clients using Biometrics, mostly fingerprint readers at this point.   It's our expectation that more sophisticated biometric sensors such as face recognition and whole hand readers will become more common in the next several years. 

Biometrics are part of the cutting edge of technology. Put simply, biometrics are any metrics related to human features. Fingerprinting is a very early and simple version of biometrics, like when you login to your phone using your fingerprint. As with any emerging technology, the first question you should ask is if they are safe.

How Do Biometrics Work?

If you've ever put your fingerprint into an device, you have a vague idea of how biometrics work. Basically, you record your biometric information, in this case a fingerprint. The information is then stored, to be accessed later for comparison with "live" information. Anyone else in the world can put their finger on you device's touch circle and it's not going to open your phone.

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