Dreams of the Future - 5G

HP is looking ahead a bit in this article about 5G wireless networking and what it will be able to do. But as always, the future is right around the corner.

5G means much more than pure speed
The fifth generation of wireless technology is about to enter the mainstream, as all the major wireless carriers prepare to launch their own 5G wireless networks in the not-too-distant future. But 5G is much more than just a 4G upgrade - and it’s going to affect a lot more than your phone.

So really, how fast is 5G?
Just like the switch from 3G to 4G moved us from a few megabits per second into the hundreds, 5G will blaze past 4G - in fact, a recent simulation by Qualcomm at the Mobile World Congress showed 5G performing at 10 times the speed of our current standard. This extra capacity will make for a more reliable connection, too.

[More]

How will Wi-Fi 6 and 5G Cellular Service Work Together

There's a certain amount of confusion surrounding Wi-Fi 6 and 5G.  This Cisco based article discusses both and how they will ultimately work together.

Why the two wireless technologies will be better together.

So, you’re all prepared for the next innovations in mobility and looking for next-generation speeds and more bandwidth. But with all of the hype around both Wi-Fi 6 and 5G, what can each of technologies actually do? With Wi-Fi officially turning 20 this year and World Wi-Fi Day celebrated on June 20th, let’s learn how the newest mobile technologies are changing the future. Here we’ll break down some basic definitions and capabilities of Wi-Fi 6 and 5G, and share how the two can actually work in-sync.

[More]

5G and Wi-Fi 6 - Evolution & Revolution

One of the few constants in technology is change. Scott Gurvey writing for Cisco provides a detailed, but not overly technical overview about two upcoming changes in the way data is handled wirelessly. When fully developed these technologies will make possible what is not possible today, change the face of mobile technology, and will fully connect the world.

5G and Wi-Fi 6 both promise great increases in the data handling capabilities, enabling a new generation of applications.

As you can tell by all the marketing hype, 5G is upon us. The mobile telephone carriers are touting their plans to roll out 5G, the Fifth Generation of wireless service, although specifics about the timetable, fees and applications are difficult to come by.

Wi-Fi 6 is somewhat more obscure. That’s because the branding has never really caught on with the equipment makers who instead opted to describe their gear with the string of numbers and letters referencing the IEEE standard which defines the technology. Wi-Fi 6 is 802.11ax. And that is a mouthful for consumers to remember.

[More]

Why use a VPN on Public Wi-Fi Networks

Ithaca is a traveling community. The vast majority of our student population travels to and from Ithaca. Our business community and many individuals travel regularly for business. Virtually everyone who travels with a laptop, pad, or other mobile device usually ends up on some type of public Wi-Fi network. Getting to your data without exposing your private information to others takes effort. VPN technology is a good solution. The VPN discussed here is from Norton, but there are many other good ones as well.

If you’ve ever wondered if it’s safe to use public Wi-Fi, you are not alone. In fact, according to the Norton Cybersecurity Insights Report, 6 in 10 consumers believe using public Wi-Fi is riskier than using a public restroom. And it is. Surfing the Web or transacting on an unsecured Wi-Fi network means you’re placing your private information and anonymity at risk. That’s why a virtual private network, better known as a VPN, is a must for anyone worried about online security and privacy.

What is a VPN?

A virtual private network gives you online privacy and anonymity by creating a private network from a public Internet connection. VPNs mask your Internet protocol (IP) address so your online actions are virtually untraceable. Most important, VPN services establish secure and encrypted connections, guaranteed to provide greater privacy than even a secured Wi-Fi hotspot.

[More]

Researchers Discover a bug in WiFi Encryption

Nearly everyone with a laptop, "pad" or smartphone regularly uses public and private Wi-Fi access points. Many have what's called WPA2 Security on them. We all dutifully setup a relatively complex password to get on these WiFi systems. Once done, our machines automatically connect to these networks when we're in range.  Perfect, easy, and secure - well not quite.

Several months ago, a vulnerability in WPA2 was discovered. Most of the big guys (Microsoft, Apple, etc.) quicly patched their operating systems, some even before the WiFi access point manufacturers. If your systems were automatically updated, you were likely fine. The non-technical press recently caught on to what's been going on and the articles started flowing and so did the phone calls and emails to us about the condition of clients WiFi systems. 

This article from the FTC does a good job of reviewing the issue in a non-technical fashion. Be cautious as always about how you access WiFi networks, particularly public ones.

You’ve read recent news stories about a vulnerability discovered in the WPA2 encryption standard. (Some reports refer to it as KRACK – Key Reinstallation Attack.) Should this be of concern to your business? Yes. Does it warrant further action at your company? Absolutely.

If you or anyone at your business uses a smartphone, laptop, or IoT device connected to a Wi-Fi network, the information sent over that network could be at risk. Researchers have found a bug that lets attackers “break” WPA2 – the encryption that protects most wireless networks – leaving data you send exposed.

The bad news is that this isn’t just a problem with a specific device or manufacturer. It’s a problem with the encryption standard nearly all Wi-Fi devices on the market use to scramble communications, prevent eavesdropping, and deter tampering. The upshot is that if anyone at your business uses a device to connect to a wireless network at work, at home, or on the road, this bug means they can’t rely on that connection being secure.

[More]

More Entries