Bar Code Technology & More

Bar codes, QR codes & RFID tags can feel like another language to the uninitiated.  However, these technologies are in use all over and can be very useful for your business or organization.

Scanning technology is moving far beyond the laser-scanned barcodes you've become familiar with at grocery stores, gyms, and concerts. In fact, you're likely using or benefiting from next-generation RFID and QR codes right now. The NFL used RFID in 2015 to provide what it calls "Next Gen Stats" for every player on the field.1 Your own business could be using this scanning technology to boost your bottom line, attract customers, control inventory, and more.

 

While RFID, QR codes, and barcodes are all ways to communicate information in a way that machines can quickly and easily understand, there are key differences between each. Here's what these technologies are, how they work, and how you can take advantage of them.

[More]

How to work from home and look good doing it

We often get used asked at The Computing Center -- "Do we allow our employees to work from home?"  Our answer is: "It depends!"  Some of our positions lend themselves easily to telecommuting, while others require staff members to be regularly in the office or able to visit client sites.  For us, it's a matter of flexibility.  If someone needs to be home with a sick child, it makes good business sense to let them work from home. To us, the key to being a great telecommuter is that our co-workers and most importantly, our clients shouldn't be able to tell the difference. Now where was this blog post created from?

In the last decade, the mobile workforce has increased by more than 100 percent—not that surprising when we consider the abundant improvement in technology over that same time period. Telecommuting offers wonderful benefits to companies and workers alike, with an improved work-life balance topping the charts. Not only that, but a 2015 Gallup poll shows that telecommuters are more likely to be more engaged in their jobs, and being engaged can lead to higher profitability, mobile productivity, customer engagement and other positive business outcomes.

But mobile teams experience problems of their own. At the forefront is the disconnection that naturally occurs when team members work separate from the rest of the team. Not only do telecommuters sometimes miss out on deeper relationships with co-workers, they don't get to experience office culture and can easily miss important announcements. A case study conducted among full-time telecommuters at a Chinese travel agency even showed that mobile workers were up to 50 percent less likely to receive promotions.

[More]

How to find your office Zen

 How to find your office Zen

Sometimes we all need to step away from our work and take a little break. But often, actually leaving the office isn’t an option. So what do you do when you need a quick mental vacation? Thankfully, the same technology that helps you stay productive can help you productively relax, too. Here are five tech tips that can help you find your balance, right in the midst of a hectic workday.

Block out the noise
If you work in a noisy office environment, noise-reducing headphones can mute three-fourths of the commotion around you.Built-in microprocessors go beyond simply drowning out unwanted distractions. They actively make things quieter by analyzing background noise and creating an inverse sound wave that cancels out offending sounds.

[More]

Check yourself before sending that email

Editor's Note - How many times have you received an email and wondered what the sender was thinking when they wrote it? Before any email gets sent a content review usually makes sense.  Here are some additional tips.

Despite the numerous means of communication, email is still heavily relied upon to deliver messages in the business world, especially for remote workers. Even in the office, it often seems easier to shoot off emails to colleagues instead of walking the 50 feet to their desk. If email is replacing some basic human interactions, we need to pay more attention to how we’re using it.

When composing an email, it’s often easy to forget there’s a human on the other side. You should manually check the tone of each and every message you send to make sure you’re communicating your message in the most effective way possible, leaving less room for misinterpretation.

[More]

Robocalls and Your Business

We are not fans of "robocalls"!  You know, the calls that come in within five minutes of sitting down to dinner.  However certain kinds of telemarketing is legal.  Here the thoughts of one FTC attorney.

Call me (call me) on the line.
Call me, call me any, anytime.

We were big Blondie fans, but if the lyrics of “Call Me” are any indication, they’re not the best source of information about complying with the Do Not Call and robocall provisions of the Telemarketing Sales Rule. So we’re turning to FTC attorney Bikram Bandy to get answers to questions that businesses are asking.

My company has a great new product and we want to do a robocall campaign to let consumers know about it. Of course, we want to comply with the law, so we’re downloading the Do Not Call Registry to make sure our robocalls don’t go to those numbers. No problems, right?

BIKRAM:  Wrong. If you’re trying to sell something, you can’t place robocalls to any phone number – even numbers that aren’t on the Do Not Call Registry. The only exception is if the consumer has given signed written permission to receive robocalls on behalf of your company (not your affiliates, marketing partners, etc. – your company). The written permission must include the consumer’s phone number and has to clearly and conspicuously explain that he or she gives your company permission to make robocalls. The bottom line: If you don’t have valid written permission, you can’t send robocalls. Period.

[More]

Previous Entries / More Entries